Amazon Prime Card offering new Whole Foods card art, limited-time bonus

On Jan. 20, Chase announced a new card design option for the Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Signature card featuring Whole Foods Market art and added a limited-time sign-up bonus offer for those who prefer to shop at Whole Foods in-store.

Amazon has become a leader in grocery shopping during the pandemic, with consumers avoiding grocery stores due to health safety concerns – not to mention the convenience of shopping from a web browser. Amazon Prime members can enjoy speedy free delivery, as well as get access to online shopping at Whole Foods Market and special member deals when shopping in-store.

They can also count on extra savings if they carry the Amazon Prime Rewards card from Chase – or if they’re looking to apply in the next few weeks.

Here’s what you need to know.

Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Signature card

Amazon Prime Card Whole Foods

Our rating: 3.8 out of 5
Score required: Good to excellent
Type of card: Cash back
Spending categories: Amazon, Whole Foods, restaurants, gas stations, drug stores

  • 5% back on Amazon.com and Whole Foods purchases
  • 2% back on restaurant, gas station and drug store purchases
  • 1% back on other purchases
  • $70 Amazon.com gift card upon approval or $100 statement credit after spending $100 at Whole Foods in first 2 months
  • No annual fee

Our take: While the Amazon Prime Rewards card offers excellent cash back on Amazon and Whole Foods purchases, it might not be the best choice for customers who don’t currently have a Prime membership and aren’t looking to subscribe.

A new Whole Foods card design and limited-time offer

Chase introduced a new card design option for new Amazon Prime Rewards cardholders, featuring Whole Foods Market art. New cardmembers with an eligible Prime membership can choose the new design when they apply for the card. If you’re an existing cardholder and would like to switch to the new design option, you can call in to request a new card after Jan. 22.

If you frequently shop at Whole Foods in-store, the new limited-time introductory offer can also be exciting news for you. Through March 3, new Amazon Prime Rewards Visa cardholders can earn a $100 statement credit after spending $100 in Whole Foods Market stores in the first two months from account opening. Alternatively, they can still choose the standard $70 Amazon gift card offer as a sign-up bonus.

Considering the standard bonus is lower, the new temporary offer might be a better deal. On the other hand, if you avoid shopping in-store or normally use Amazon Fresh for buying groceries, the gift card might make more sense for you.

Should I start shopping at Whole Foods if I have an Amazon credit card?

If you already shop at Whole Foods, the 5% back with the Amazon Prime Rewards Signature Visa and 10% off specially marked items is a good deal. The discounts, though, don’t make Whole Foods cheaper than other grocery stores.

In fact, according to a study from 2019, Whole Foods remains the most expensive grocery store with its prices at 34% above Walmart, which was reported to have the lowest prices overall. If your goal is to save on groceries, Whole Foods is evidently not the best option – even if you carry the Amazon Prime card.

Other cards to consider

The Amazon Prime Card isn’t the only option you should consider if you often shop on Amazon or at Whole Foods.

See related: Which is the best card to use on Amazon.com purchases?

For instance, with the Chase Amazon.com Rewards Visa card, you can get a $50 Amazon gift card upon approval and earn 3% on Amazon and Whole Foods purchases, 2% percent at restaurants, gas stations and drugstores and 1% on all else. If you don’t have a Prime membership and aren’t looking to subscribe, this is a good option, since the card doesn’t require a cardholder to be a member.

If you do have a membership and shop on Amazon a lot, the Amazon Prime card is a better deal. With 5% for purchases made at Whole Foods and on Amazon, 2% at restaurants, gas stations and drugstores and 1% on all else, this card is hard to beat for Amazon and Whole Foods lovers.

If you’re looking for a card to buy groceries, consider the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express, which could save you more than the Amazon Prime Visa at Whole Foods. Why? Blue Cash Preferred cardholders earn 6% cash back at U.S. supermarkets (up to $6,000 in purchases per year, then 1%).

See related: Best credit cards for grocery shopping

Bottom line

You can now stack your rewards at Whole Foods, earning cash back and the limited-time bonus with the Amazon Prime Card, and you can get extra savings from the loyalty program. Whether it makes sense to shop at Whole Foods, even with rewards cards and the loyalty program, is up to you.

Source: creditcards.com

Average credit card interest rates: Week of January 20, 2021

The average credit card interest rate is 16.05%.

U.S. credit card lenders once again declined to revise APRs on some of the country best-known cards, according to the CreditCards.com Weekly Credit Card Rate Report. None of the 100 cards tracked weekly by CreditCards.com advertised new rates. As a result, the average starting APR for brand-new cards remained at 16.05% for the eighth consecutive week.

APRs have remained within rounding distance of 16% for nearly 10 consecutive months

APRs on brand-new credit cards have remained unusually stable for months now. For example, the average new card APR hasn’t wavered by more than a quarter of a percentage point since April and it has remained just above 16% since mid-November. Earlier in the year, the average card APR briefly dipped to 15.97%, which is the lowest APR average CreditCards.com has recorded since 2017. But for most of 2020, the average card APR remained above 16%.

Despite their current stability, average APRs are dramatically lower than they were a year ago when the average APR began 2020 at 17.30%.

At that time, even cardholders with excellent credit were likely to be assigned rates as high as 17% or more. Today, by contrast, few general market cards that are marketed to borrowers with the best credit charge such high rates.

Among the 100 cards tracked by CreditCards.com, for example, only one general market card for borrowers with excellent credit currently charges a minimum APR above 16.99%. The Capital One Venture Rewards Card starts APRs at 17.24% and caps them at 24.49%. But most comparable cards charge lower rates.

Among travel rewards cards, for example:

  • The Bank of America® Premium Rewards® card and the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card both start APRs at 15.99%
  • The APRs on the high-end Chase Sapphire Reserve card and Citi Prestige® Card start at 16.99%.
  • The minimum APR on the Discover it® Miles card is 11.99% while the APRs on a number of popular airline cards, such as the Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards Premier Credit Card, the Delta SkyMiles® Gold American Express Card and the Frontier Airlines World Mastercard from Barclays, start below 16%.

The average maximum card APR is also significantly lower. For example, the average maximum APR for all 100 cards included in the CreditCards.com rate report is currently 23.55%. The average median APR is 19.8%.

Capital One’s decision to leave rates alone last spring leaves it out of step with other issuers

When the Federal Reserve cut federal interest rates by more than a full percentage point last spring, Capital One was the only major, nationwide issuer not to match the central bank’s rate cut on new general market cards. As a result, cardholders with lower scores are less likely than other cardholders these days to secure a significantly lower APR than what they would have been able to get a year ago.

That’s because Capital One is one of the leading issuers of cards for borrowers with fair credit. Its line of subprime cards continues to charge the same 26.99% APR the cards advertised for much of last winter.

However, borrowers with lower scores do have more options than they had a year ago if they compare rates with other issuers. For example:

  • The Discover it® Secured card and the BankAmericard Secured Credit Card currently offer a 22.99% APR.
  • The Citi® Secured Mastercard® card starts APRs at 22.49%.

Not all lenders have given borrowers with bad credit a reprieve, though, amid the pandemic. For example, U.S. Bank dramatically hiked the APR on its flagship secured card, pushing the card’s only APR to 25.99%. As a result, the average APR for all subprime cards tracked by CreditCards.com is the same as it was a year ago: 25.3%.

The average APR for rewards cards, by contrast, has fallen from 17.11% to 15.76%, while the average low interest card APR has tumbled from 14.1% to 12.77%.

See related: How do credit card APRs work?

*All information about the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card and the Citi Prestige has been collected independently by CreditCards.com and has not been reviewed by the issuer. This offer is no longer available on our site.

CreditCards.com’s Weekly Rate Report

Avg. APR Last week 6 months ago
National average 16.05% 16.05% 16.03%
Low interest 12.77% 12.77% 12.83%
Cash back 15.85% 15.85% 16.09%
Balance transfer 13.85% 13.85% 13.93%
Business 13.91% 13.91% 13.91%
Student 16.12% 16.12% 16.12%
Airline 15.53% 15.53% 15.48%
Rewards 15.76% 15.76% 15.82%
Instant approval 18.38% 18.38% 18.65%
Bad credit 25.30% 25.30% 24.43%
Methodology: The national average credit card APR is comprised of 100 of the most popular credit cards in the country, including cards from dozens of leading U.S. issuers and representing every card category listed above. (Introductory, or teaser, rates are not included in the calculation.)
Source: CreditCards.com
Updated: January 20, 2021

Historic interest rates by card type

Some credit cards charge even higher rates, on average. The type of rate you get will depend in part on the category of credit card you own. For example, even the best travel credit cards often charge higher rates than basic, low interest credit cards.

CreditCards.com has been calculating average rates for a wide variety of credit card categories, including student cards, balance transfer cards, cash back cards and more, since 2007.

How to get a low credit card interest rate

Your odds of getting approved for a card’s lowest rate will increase the more you improve your credit score. Some factors that influence your credit card APR will be out of your control, such as the length of time you’ve been handling credit.

However, even if you’re new to credit or are rebuilding your score, there are steps you can take to ensure a lower APR. For example:

  1. Pay your bills on time. The single most important factor influencing your credit score – and your ability to win a lower rate – is your track record of making on-time payments. Lenders are more likely to trust you with a competitive APR – and other positive terms, such as a big credit limit – if you have a lengthy history of paying your bills on time.
  2. Keep your balances low. Lenders also want to see that you are responsible with your credit and don’t overcharge. As a result, credit scores take into account the amount of credit you’re using, compared to how much credit you’ve been given. This is known as your credit utilization ratio. Typically, the lower your ratio, the better. For example, personal finance experts often recommend that you keep your balances well below 30% of your total credit limit.
  3. Build a lengthy and diverse credit history. Lenders also like to see that you’ve been successfully using credit for a long time and have experience with different types of credit, including revolving credit and installment loans. As a result, credit scores, such as the FICO score and VantageScore, factor in the average length of your credit history and the types of loans you’ve handled (which is known as your credit mix). To keep your credit history as long as possible, continue to use your oldest credit card so your lender doesn’t close it.
  4. Call your lender. If you’ve successfully owned a credit card for a long time, you may be able to convince your lender to lower your interest rate – especially if you have excellent credit. Reach out to your lender and ask if they’d be willing to negotiate a lower APR.
  5. Monitor your credit report. Check your credit reports regularly to make sure you’re being accurately scored. The last thing you want is for a mistake or unauthorized account to drag down your credit score. You have the right to check your credit reports from each major credit bureau (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion) once per year for free through AnnualCreditReport.com.

Source: creditcards.com

Apple Card temporarily offering $50 sign-up bonus for Exxon Mobil purchases

Many rewards credit cards offer the opportunity to earn a sign-up bonus. Even some no-annual-fee credit cards offer them, allowing consumers to maximize cash back or points without paying every year for simply having the card.

The Apple Card only started offering a sign-up bonus in June, when Apple cardholders could earn $50 in Daily Cash after spending $50 at Walgreens. This was followed by offers in September, October and November, most recently including a $75 sign-up bonus after spending $75 at Nike in-store and online via Apple Pay.

And now through Jan. 31, new Apple Card holders can score a slightly lower sign-up bonus. You’ll get $50 in Daily Cash after you spend $50 or more on purchases with Exxon or Mobil.

See related: Apple Card: One year later

How to get the Apple Card sign-up bonus

New Apple Card holders who open an account between Jan. 8 and Jan. 31, 2021 can earn $50 in Apple’s Daily Cash when they spend $50 using Apple Card with Apple Pay (where available) at Exxon and Mobil stations at the pump or at attached convenience stores in the U.S., within 30 days of the account opening. To pay at the pump with Apple Pay, you can use either the Exxon Mobil Rewards+ mobile app or contactless payment.

This month’s sign-up bonus from Apple is lower than its previous offer from Nike, but on par with the older offers from Walgreens and Panera Bread, both of which got you just $50 in Daily Cash back after a matching spend.

You can apply for the Apple Card from the Wallet app on your iPhone.

Should you apply for the Apple Card now?

If you have been considering applying for the Apple Card, it might be a good idea to do so this month, especially if you commute or drive often enough to spend $50 at gas stations in a month. While the card doesn’t always come with a sign-up bonus, new cardholders currently have a great chance to earn one.

Besides that, the Apple Card offers 3% cash back on Apple purchases, as well as 3% cash back when you use Apple Pay for Walgreens, Nike and Uber and Uber Eats purchases and at T-Mobile stores. Other Apple Pay purchases will earn you 2% in cash back. When you use the physical card, the cash back rate goes down to 1%.

However, the Apple Card might not make sense for everyone. The earning rate is good on Apple purchases, but if you’re looking for a primary cash back card to add to your wallet, there might be better options.

For example, with the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express you can earn 3% cash back at U.S. supermarkets (on up to $6,000 per year in purchases, then 1%) and 2% cash back at U.S. gas stations and select U.S. department stores. All other purchases will get you 1% in cash back.

Another alternative is the Capital One Quicksilver Cash Rewards Credit Card, which earns you unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase and doesn’t have an annual fee. Plus, you only need to spend $500 in the first three months with the card to earn its $200 sign-up bonus.

There are quite a few other cards to look into. Shop around before you decide to take advantage of Apple’s offer. The sign-up bonus alone shouldn’t tempt you into signing up for a card that doesn’t align with your spending.

See related: Apple card credit score requirements and reasons for denial

Final thoughts

If you’re an Apple enthusiast and have been looking into the Apple Card for some time, now might be a good time to apply. The new limited-time sign-up offer gives you an opportunity to earn an easy sign-up bonus – something the card doesn’t normally have.

Source: creditcards.com

Credit card industry trends to watch for in 2021

Each year, CreditCards.com asks the experts to predict what the credit card landscape will be like in the coming year.

Read industry gurus’ forecasts now and see what changes credit card issuers might have in store for 2021.

See related: Best credit cards of 2021

More flexibility in card offers

Steven Dashiell, credit cards expert for Finder, expects the exceptional welcome offers and expanded reward opportunities we saw throughout 2020 will continue into 2021.

“These card adjustments were a response to evolving consumer spending habits during the pandemic and I foresee these spending habits lasting well through 2021,” Dashiell said.

Nishank Khanna, chief financial offer for Clarify Capital, noted that consumers are spending more on essential goods than discretionary items, so credit cards will likely offer more benefits for groceries and home goods.

“We can expect to continue to see flexibility with card offers, with many card issuers providing cash back options and diverse opportunities for the cardholder to decide how she or he spends rewards,” Khanna said.

This move is especially important for consumers who are exploring the perks they can get as they battle the impact of lockdowns and travel restrictions.

‘Buy now, pay later’ options will be more in demand

Given the current financial climate, consumers have gravitated toward alternative payment methods such as buy now, pay later options, said Imani Francies, a financial expert at USInsuranceAgents.com.

These services allow consumers to make large purchases by paying only a percentage of the total cart amount – they are then expected to make biweekly or bimonthly payments until the entirety of the purchase amount is paid off.

But Francies warned that if this way of paying becomes too addicting, people may start using credit cards to keep up with their payment plans, which could hurt their credit scores and transform the buy now, pay later option into a negative experience.

contactless payment technologies, said Vince Granziani, CEO of IDEX Biometrics.

For example, biometric fingerprint technology allows the user to make touchless payments via a fingerprint stored on a credit card that is safe, secure and unique to that individual.

The global demand for biometric technology in the payments industry is robust and will accelerate as business returns to a new normal in 2021 and beyond, Granziani predicted.

In 2021 and beyond, biometric smart cards will also become increasingly necessary to combat payment fraud. These cards prevent hackers from stealing your PIN or fingerprint data since it’s all stored directly on your card.

Therefore, if anyone were to steal or attempt using your card, they couldn’t do it without your fingerprint to activate a transaction, Granziani said.

Biometric cards have multiple uses, capable of holding passports and driver’s licenses ­– even library cards and travel passes – while holding your payment details all in one place, he added.

See related: Credit card scams in the time of coronavirus

Increased transparency will be the name of the game

Charles Tran, founder of CreditDonkey, forecast that credit card companies will offer increased transparency in 2021.

Transparency has always been a significant factor in the financial industry and it’s becoming an essential point of focus considering the tough times we are in, so credit cards will have to offer simplicity and utility to stand out.

“This will include transparency in the reward systems, fewer hidden fees, complimentary credit score monitoring and easier rewards redemption,” Tran added.

See related: 2020 credit card fee survey – What happened to 0% balance transfer offers?

Issuers may get tougher on delinquent debtors

Adem Selita, CEO and co-founder of The Debt Relief Company, sees an unsettling trend happening with regard to cross-collateralization, a method lenders use to secure one type of loan with the collateral from another.

For example, if you bought a car from a credit union and didn’t keep up with the payments, the credit union could repossess the car to satisfy your loan.

Selita believes credit card companies will become more aggressive regarding credit card defaults – depending on how the economy unfolds in the intermediate term – and even add features like collateralization to use consumers’ funds to pay their delinquent credit card bills.

In addition, Selita said, an updated law that goes into effect in 2021 will allow debt collectors to contact debtors via social media channels, text and voicemail.

And although they are not allowed to use social media to harass debtors, Selita said it still amounts to “essentially stalking consumers behind on their credit card bills and in default.”

2021 will be a comeback year for credit cards

There will still be some pain in terms of delinquencies and difficulty accessing credit, but 2021 will be a comeback year for credit cards, according to Ted Rossman, industry analyst for CreditCards.com.

The news of an effective COVID vaccine bodes well for a return to travel, dining and other discretionary spending that is so important for credit card companies.

But the improvement won’t be immediate or evenly distributed, Rossman warned.

Unfortunately, many consumers will fall behind on their payments, especially as stimulus and hardship programs wear off.

Many banks are expecting delinquencies to peak around mid-2021, although there’s still a fair amount of uncertainty around that.

This trend should keep a lid on 0% balance transfers and access to credit for people with lower credit scores, but the rebound will mean more competition for people with high credit scores and incomes, Rossman predicted.

“We’re already seeing some of this with the recent Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card bonuses, and in 2021 I think we’ll see even hotter competition for the most creditworthy applicants.” he said.

Start your journey to financial freedom

Whatever might happen in the credit card industry in 2021, if you and manage your credit well you will stay financially healthy.

Spend wisely, avoid opening new credit you don’t need, manage your existing debt and live within your means, and you’ll be on the road to financial freedom.

See related: Overcoming hardships by embracing financial independence

Source: creditcards.com

Fed reports credit card balances continued to dip in November

Credit card balances slightly dipped in November, as the COVID pandemic fallouts continued, and with the government continuing to wrangle about a second round of fiscal stimulus measures.

Consumer revolving debt – which is mostly based on credit card balances – was down $700 million on a seasonally adjusted basis in November to $978.8 billion, according to the Fed’s G. 19 consumer credit report released Jan. 8.

In November, credit card balances were off 1% on an annualized basis, after October’s 6.7% drop, which came on the heels of September’s 3.2% annualized gain.

Total consumer debt outstanding – which includes student loans and auto loans, as well as revolving debt – continued to grow and rose $15.3 billion to $4.176 trillion in November, a 4.4% annualized gain.

Card balances had touched an all-time high in February 2020 before the coronavirus pandemic started impacting consumer spending and bank lending. They dipped below the $1 trillion mark in May, for the first time since September 2017.

The Fed also reports that interest rates on credit cards were at 14.65% in November, with the rates on cards that are assessed interest (since they carry a balance) at 16.28%.

See related: Paying with credit is getting more expensive in the pandemic

Consumers expect household spending to rise

Consumers expect their household spending at the median to grow 3.7% in the year ahead, the highest in more than four years – even though they don’t anticipate much growth in their income (2.1%) or earnings (2%) – according to the New York Fed’s survey of consumer expectations for November.

Moreover, they are less optimistic about their household financial situation in the year ahead, with more of them expecting it to decline, and fewer consumers expecting an improvement.

Even then, more respondents are optimistic about their ability to access credit in the coming year, expecting it will be easier. However, the mean probability of missing a minimum debt payment in the next three months rose by 1.6 percentage points to 10.9%. Even then, this is still below its 11.5% average for 2019.

Less cheer on labor market front

On the labor market front, more consumers expect that the U.S. unemployment rate will be higher in the year ahead, with the average probability of this outcome rising to 40.1% in November, from October’s 35.4%.

However, they were less pessimistic about the prospects of losing their jobs, with this probability down to 14.6% on average, from October’s 15.5% (but still above the 2019 average of 14.3%).  Those above the age of 60 and those without a college degree were more optimistic about holding on to their jobs.

The respondents were less likely to voluntarily leave their jobs, with the mean probability of this down 1.3 percentage points to 16.6% (a low for the survey). Those 60 and older were at the forefront of this decline. However, respondents on average were more optimistic about the prospects for landing a new job if they lost their current ones.

In the meantime, the government reported that the economy shed 140,000 jobs in December, and the unemployment rate remained at 6.7%. The jobs lost were mostly in the sectors hard hit from the pandemic, with closures impacting the leisure and hospitality sector, as well as private education jobs.

The retail sector added jobs to aid holiday shopping, mostly in warehouses (which benefit from e-commerce) and superstores.

Although average hourly earnings for private sector employees rose $0.23, this is mostly because of the loss of lower-paying jobs in the leisure and hospitality sector, which tilted the average wage for the employed workers to the upside.

In online commentary, Diane Swonk, chief economist at GrantThornton, noted, “The silver lining to a bad overall jobs report is that the losses were concentrated in sectors that are most sensitive to COVID. Many of those jobs will come back once we get to herd immunity. The challenge is getting there, given the slow rollout of vaccines and poor uptake in some areas.”

Given that it will take a while to more fully open the economy, she is in favor of “aid today and another tranche once the new administration takes office.”

See related: Second stimulus deal provides $600 per individual

Application rates for credit cards plunged on pandemic impact

The New York Fed also reported in its credit access survey, which is conducted every four months as part of its survey of consumer expectations, that most credit applications and acceptance rates fell sharply after last February. Mortgage credit was the exception to this.

For credit cards, the application rate was off a steep 10.6 percentage points since February to touch a survey low of 15.7%. This decline impacted all age groups and credit score categories. Applications for credit card limit increases dropped 6.6 percentage points to 7.1% between February and October, another series low since the survey began in October 2013. The decline was spread across all ages and credit score categories.

Consumers applying for credit cards were also subject to steep rejection rates, with this rate rising 11.6 percentage points from February to touch 21.3% in October. Those looking for higher credit limits also were rejected about 37% of the time, from about 25% of the time in February.

No wonder consumers said they were less likely to apply for a credit card or credit limit increase in the next 12 months, with these figures falling 36% and 34% on average since February 2020. Those with credit scores above 680 led this decline.

Source: creditcards.com