3 Big Reasons Your Home Offer Was Rejected—and How To Play It Right Next Time

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For first-time home buyers, finding the perfect place to settle down is hard enough. But then to have the offer you’ve made on it rejected? You might be tempted to start reconsidering this whole homeownership thing altogether.

But hold on! Having your home offer rejected doesn’t have to mean it’s back to renting. In fact, if you play your cards right, you might just be able to turn that rejection around—or at least learn from the experience and come back a stronger candidate the next time.

The most important aspect of a rejected offer is understanding why it was rejected, and for that we turned to the experts. Here are a few common reasons your home offer might have been rejected, and a few helpful tips on what you can do about it.

3 common reasons sellers reject home offers

Home offers are rejected for myriad reasons. Here are some of the most common ones, as explained by the experts.

1. Your offer was too low

The first and most obvious reason your home offer could have been rejected is if the dollar amount didn’t meet the seller’s expectations. This might mean your offer was insultingly low, or that it was just low compared with other offers.

Often, buyers “believe the best way to start a negotiation is with an offer that’s lower than what they’re willing to pay,” says Colby Hager, owner of CapstoneHomebuyers. “This can work, but it can also backfire. When a seller is considering multiple offers, the low offer seems less serious and could indicate further negotiating headaches down the road.”

Keep in mind that sellers are looking for a good deal just as much as you are, and you should plan on working with your real estate agent to make sure the sellers at least feel like they’re getting one.

2. Your earnest money deposit was too ‘cheap’

If there’s one part of the offer you shouldn’t cheap out on, it’s the earnest money deposit. This deposit (also called an EMD or “good faith” deposit) basically signifies how interested you are in the home and that you plan on moving forward with the deal, all the way to its closing.

“Believe it or not, there are buyers who get cold feet and walk away from a transaction days before closing,” says Shannon Hall, broker and owner of Dwellings by Rudy & Hall. “The EMD should be enough to let a seller know you’re very interested, and also uncomfortable with the idea of leaving it on the table.”

Since many contracts stipulate that a seller can keep the earnest money deposit when a buyer walks at the last minute, you should feel certain about the house—and then convey this certainty by leaving a significant deposit.

Hager recommends putting down at least 1% of the purchase price to show sellers you mean business.

3. You asked for too many contingencies

Sellers don’t just want the best price for their home; they also want the easiest deal—which means no complications.

“Sellers like the least number of contingencies,” stresses Hall.

“But that’s not to say that a buyer should waive the due diligence period,” she adds. “Make it shorter, but don’t waive it. And if you need multiple contingencies, that’s fine; but look for a home that’s been on the market for at least 30 days.”

Since sellers are generally more willing to make concessions on a home they’ve been trying to sell for several weeks, this is a good approach to take if you’re a picky buyer with multiple contingencies.

“Sellers also don’t like to give away their money to help someone get into a home,” says Hall.

Make your deal an easier and more appealing one for sellers by sticking to the fewest number of contingencies possible, getting due diligence done quickly, or targeting homes that have been on the market for longer.

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Watch: 5 Things You Should Never Do When Buying a Home

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What to do if your home offer is rejected

The first step is understanding why the offer was rejected in the first place.

“If an offer was rejected, a buyer can try again, depending on the reason it was rejected,” explains Karen Parnes, broker and owner of NextHome Your Way.

“If you need a certain home sale contingency, for instance, and can’t remove it, then move on,” Parnes says. “But if you can pay more and the market warrants it, resubmit a better offer.”

How to avoid future home offer rejections

Although rejection is sometimes unavoidable, there are things you can do to increase your chances of making a successful home offer.

For instance, “a buyer should come into the market already aware that he or she will have competition,” Hall says.

In addition to putting your best foot forward, you should be sure you’re working with an agent who has the skills to close the deal.

“A good real estate agent can help by guiding the buyer on the expected norms of offers in their area,” says Hager.  “A real estate agent will also know the market and help you figure out if starting with a lower offer is advisable—or if a strong offer out of the gate will get the best results.”

One final bit of advice: Work with an agent who understands seller interests.

“The buyer’s agents who most often win the day are the ones who reach out to sellers before submitting an offer,” says Hager. “They have the best chance of not being rejected because they took the time to understand the seller’s situation.”

And if your home offer still gets dismissed, don’t be too disappointed. In a seller’s market, “buyers are bound to have their offers rejected,” says Parnes. “Homes are coming off the market quickly, and sellers’ expectations are high.”

If your offer gets rejected, work with an agent to fix it or simply move on to the next home. Then make an offer the seller can’t resist.

The post 3 Big Reasons Your Home Offer Was Rejected—and How To Play It Right Next Time appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com

My House Failed Its First Real Estate Inspection—Here’s What I Did To Get Through Escrow

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When I was buying my first house, everything seemed too good to be true—at least at the start of the process. I found a home within a couple of weeks, the price was fabulously low, it was in a cute lake community with a style I loved, and funding came through quickly and easily. I even received a first-time home buyer’s bonus for tax time. Plus, I didn’t need much of a down payment.

But it turned out too good to be true. My smooth path to homeownership suddenly became rocky when the inspection report came back with a big fat failure on it. I immediately panicked. What did it mean? Was I still able to buy the house? And if I did, was it going to fall apart?

After a few calls with my real estate agent (who, at that point, had become more of a home-buying therapist), I learned that a bad inspection isn’t that rare. In fact, my new home wasn’t in as bad of shape as I initially feared. We were able to make some repairs and, after a second inspection, the house was appraised and the sale was able to go through.

During the process, though, I learned a lot more than I ever expected about home inspections. Whether you’re a first-time or repeat home buyer, here’s my advice for getting the house you want after a shaky home inspection.

Houses don’t really pass or fail

Though my home inspection appeared to be a failure, homes aren’t actually graded on a pass/fail system.

“There is no such thing as a failed inspection,” said Karen Kostiw, an agent with Warburg Realty in New York. “The inspection just points out small and potentially larger issues that you may not be aware of.”

Sure, some houses can sail through the process and others may fare poorly, but it’s not a “You can never buy this” situation if there are problems with the property.

For me, my mortgage hinged on a solid inspection—so the initial results meant I wouldn’t get the loan unless things were fixed. That being said, if I had enough cash on hand or wanted to try a different mortgage lender, I could have continued with the purchase even with a negative inspection report.

So if the house you’re set on buying ends up having issues, don’t panic. You still have options.

Most inspection issues are small

It’s important to remember every home inspection report will come back with something, according to Kate Ziegler, a real estate agent with Arborview Realty in Boston. My inspection report had noted about 40 fixes. But a lot of times, the problems aren’t as bad as you think.

Keep in mind that the inspector’s job is to call out any trouble spot. Also, all issues noted in the report aren’t equal: Some problems flagged by an inspector can wait.

“The inspector will find defects—sometimes many defects—but that does not mean buyers are not purchasing a good home,” Kostiw says. “The small leak might mean a bolt needs to be tightened, or the dishwasher is not working because the waterline was switched off by accident. These are easy fixes. However, when buyers see a laundry list of items, it can seem as if the home is falling down. This is most often not the case.”

Red flags do exist

Ziegler and Kostiw agree that though most repairs are easy fixes, some items should give you pause if you see them on your report.

Structural problems, antique electrical systems, old windows, unexplained water damage, evidence of termites or wood rot, a bad roof, asbestos, mold, radon, and lead paint are all red flags that can show up during a home inspection. If fixing these problems is impossible or way beyond the means your budget, you may want to reconsider your purchase.

“Whether or not inspection items warrant backing out entirely depends quite a bit on any individual buyer’s experience and bandwidth, as well as personal risk tolerances and financial situation,” Ziegler says. “It’s true that houses don’t stay in good repair on their own. They require maintenance and care, just like your houseplants and your sourdough starter!”

Don’t try to fix things yourself

Unless a repair is something truly minor like caulking a bathroom tub or putting a cabinet door back on its hinges, don’t try to fix anything on your own. You could make things worse or even injure yourself. Hire licensed contractors that you’ve vetted to handle any problems. And try not to leave it all up to the seller—they’re not going to be living in the home. You will be.

“Motivations in this case are not aligned,” Ziegler says. “The seller wants to spend as little as possible to meet their contractual obligations, but [a] buyer should be more concerned with the quality of the repair.”

Work the costs into the sale

At first I worried I would have to pay to fix everything that was wrong with my house. But it’s important to know you can work the cost of repairs—and how long it should take to make them—into the sale.

Say you can’t afford to fix the busted water heater but the seller can. You can raise the offer price by that cost, or you can trade off: The seller fixes one thing, and you fix another. In my case, I only had to add a banister to one stairwell. The sellers were particularly motivated to unload the home so they handled everything else.

Hopefully by the end of this process, every issue will be fixed and you’ll be ready to purchase your home. And you’ll be able to move in with a clear head, knowing everything is really as good as it seems.

The post My House Failed Its First Real Estate Inspection—Here’s What I Did To Get Through Escrow appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com