How to Avoid Filing for Bankruptcy

The post How to Avoid Filing for Bankruptcy appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

The biggest obstacle to someone with a crushing debt burden is a lack of knowledge of how to get their arms entirely around the problem, and know how to go about making it right.

They do not understand what options are available to them, and if they do, they are unsure as to what the right first step for them is.  While many think bankruptcy is the answer, some alternatives may work better.

I can relate to the soul-crushing feeling of debt. I declared bankruptcy in 2010.  While it wasn’t my finest moment, I was able to learn from my mistakes and now live the financial life I want.  But, it wasn’t easy.  I had issues with my credit for years, and it followed me everywhere I went.

Had I known about some of these bankruptcy alternatives, I could have saved myself a lot of headaches.  Take the time to research your options before you pick up the phone to call an attorney.

 

HOW TO AVOID FILING FOR BANKRUPTCY

Debt Management Programs

Debt management programs, also called debt consolidation programs or credit counseling, is a way for people to pay off their unsecured debt using a third party debt relief company. A debt management program (DMP) works like this:

  • Customer enrolls in a DMP with a debt relief company providing them with information regarding the accounts to include in the program.
  • The debt relief provider negotiates a monthly payment and reduced interest rate with the creditor that results in the elimination of the debt in 3-5 years.
  • The customer makes a single payment to the debt relief provider, including a monthly administration fee based upon the amount of debt enrolled in the program. This fee usually ranges between $10 and $50 per month. The debt relief provider then disperses the agreed upon payment amounts to each creditor.
  • In exchange for a fixed monthly payment and reduced interest rate, creditors close the accounts so that you do not accumulate additional debt. While the act of enrolling in a debt management program does not affect your credit score, the closing of accounts will affect your debt to income ratio, as well as your credit history likely causing your credit score to dip in the beginning. However, by making consistent payments to the DMP, as well as to other financial commitments, a customer’s credit score usually rebounds quickly.

DMPs generally work well for people who are current with their payments but cannot make any progress on the balances due to high interest rates. By closing the accounts to avoid future debt, and having negotiated monthly payment and lowered interest rate, DMP customers can repay their unsecured debt within 3-5 years.

 

Debt Settlement Programs

A Debt Settlement Program (DSP) involves legal representation and for people who have a dier financial situation, but who still would like to try to avoid bankruptcy. People who enroll in a DSP go through the following process:

  • Customers stop paying the creditors enrolled in the program
  • Customers make monthly payments to the debt relief provider to fund an escrow account.
  • Over time, the customer’s accounts become severely delinquent. The lawyer assigned to the account will then reach out to creditors to negotiate a settlement of the account for less than the full amount.
  • The agreed-upon settlement is paid from the escrow account.

Debt settlement will have an adverse effect on a customer’s credit score since payments to the creditors are halted. Customers may also begin to receive collection calls from the creditor, at which time they are to inform the caller of the legal representation now handling the account. By law, this should stop the phone calls. There may also be tax implications for the amount of debt forgiven through a DSP.

DSPs are generally used by people who cannot meet all their monthly financial commitments and need to lower their monthly payments but want to avoid bankruptcy. By having the debt relief provider negotiate a settlement of less than the amount owed, customers can make progress on getting creditors off their backs in 3-5 years and then focus on rebuilding their financial future.

 

Negotiate directly with your creditors

Your creditor would much rather work with you than deal with bankruptcy.  If you have assets you can liquidate and use to pay down the debt, they may be willing to accept a lower amount.  Reach out and talk to your creditors to negotiate rates or even the balances to a more manageable amount.

If your creditors are harassing you, that is illegal and you can stop it.  Read more about how to stop collectors from calling you.

 

Just Keep Trying

If you are getting by and your budget works, there may not be a reason to give bankruptcy much thought.  Instead, work to create a debt repayment plan you can follow.  It may mean getting a second job or selling items, but there are many ways you can come up with more money to throw at your debt

The worst thing that will happen is your credit score will drop.  But, if you aren’t trying to get new credit for any reason, I would not stress about it in the short term.  Once your debt is paid down, you can do many things to increase your score quickly.

 

Debt consolidation

Check with your lender to see if there is a way you can consolidate your debts into a more manageable payment.  You usually need to provide collateral, such as your vehicle.  Alternatively, you might be able to tap into the equity in your home by getting a new mortgage for the balance owed PLUS the equity (where you can use the equity to pay off your loans).

If you’ve tried everything, but can’t see any other way but bankruptcy, make sure you know what you are getting into before you file.  It affects you and your family.

 

bankruptcy alternatives

 

The post How to Avoid Filing for Bankruptcy appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com

From Bankruptcy to Paying $22,000 Cash for a Car

The post From Bankruptcy to Paying $22,000 Cash for a Car appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

rebounding from bankruptcy

I was recently a guest on the Masters of Money podcast.  One of the statements Phil made was “Wait a minute.  How does one go from declaring bankruptcy to paying $22,000 cash for a car?”

I had never really looked at my journey in that way.  But, when I thought about it, I realized –  “Dang!  That really is pretty awesome.”  And, what is even more interesting is how my bankruptcy was the catalyst for bringing me to the place I am today.


WHERE IT ALL BEGAN

When I was in my 20s, I was in a relationship. To be totally honest, it was destined to fail.  We were just really too different and so it was never going to work out.  However, being young, naive and in love, I was doing all I could to make it work.

For me, that meant buying things to make him happy.  But, truth be told, I was really spending money to make myself happy.  I loved money because it made me feel good.  I adored all it offered to me.

Sadly (and like so many others), it lead me down the path of financial ruin.  Well, not the money itself.  My attitude did.

I had such an adoration of money, and what I thought it was doing for me, that I misused it. I allowed it to take control of my life to try to fill some of the emptiness I was experiencing.

In December 2001, that relationship came to an end.  When it happened, I was devastated. It was a mix of sadness because it was over but honestly, more fear of me being able to support myself alone financially.

I had built up a lot of debt with him. While it was joint debt, we were not married. We both knew that we could not make ends meet alone and that we also needed to find a way to put this all behind us.  So, bankruptcy it was.

That following August, we met in Wichita, Kansas before the bankruptcy judge and it became official. I was bankrupt.

 

REBOUNDING FROM BANKRUPTCY

Fortunately for me, a few months after that relationship ended, I had moved to a new city and met the man I would eventually marry.  In fact, he proposed to me just a week after I declared bankruptcy.  Talk about a keeper!  😉

When I met my husband, I learned a lot about myself and what real love was like. I began to understand that it wasn’t in the things I gave him or he to me, but in the moments we shared. For the first time in my life, I experienced true love and joy.

He was the change I needed.

We married in June 2003 and knew that we wanted to start our family as soon as possible.  One thing we both agreed upon was that we wanted for me to quit my job and stay home with our children.  It was important for both of us that one of us was there to raise them.  We knew it would be a financial challenge, but one we felt we could overcome together.

In September 2004, our first daughter was born.  That was the same day I officially quit my job.

 

HERE COMES THE DEBT (AGAIN)

Once I was staying home with our little girl, our finances changed.  They had to. We could not spend as much money dining out and in other ways as we once did.  We both knew that.   However, we also had purchased a new home and there were things we needed wanted.

A few months before she was born, my husband purchased a pickup.  One month after Emma arrived, we went out and bought a brand new minivan.

Between the vehicles and a home equity loan to buy things for our house, we had accumulated quite a bit of debt.  We just kept juggling the bills and trying to balance it all – and not very successfully.

I started working part-time from home a few hours a week. That meant I was able to be here to take care of my baby, and was also able to bring in a little bit of cash.  It was difficult to do, but I knew we needed the money, so I kept at it.

Our son followed in March 2007.  There was no way I could still try to work the hours they needed for me to, and raise two kids. My kids mattered more.

So, I quit.

We continued getting by.  There were times when we robbed Peter to pay Paul.  We were making it, but not in the way we wanted to.

Then, one evening, my husband told me to go out to dinner with my friends.  Little did I know what would happen next.

 

THE DINNER THAT CHANGED IT ALL

After an evening of dinner and drinks with my girl friends, it was time to pay.  Most of us pulled out a credit or debit card to pay.  However, my son’s Godmother, Kathy, reached into her purse and pulled out an envelope.

I asked her what that was about, as I’d never seen such a thing before.  She explained how they were using cash for everything instead of plastic because they were trying to get out of debt.

That intrigued me, so I asked her more questions.  She told me how she and her husband had recently started to follow Dave Ramsey.  They were able to create a budget and a plan that was helping dig them out of debt.  She filled us in on some of the program and what they were doing.  That left me wanting to learn more.

When I walked through the door that evening, I sat down and started sharing all of this with my husband.  We knew that our friends did not make much more than we did, so we thought “if they can do it – so can we.”

I grabbed my computer and we started researching this Dave Ramsey.  We had no clue who he was or what he taught. The more we read, the more we were inspired to follow his plan.  We pulled out the debit card and made our purchase.  Nope.  We didn’t even sleep on it.

 

HOW WE CREATED OUR DEBT FREE PLAN

Once the Dave Ramsey books and materials arrived in the mail, we were like two kids on Christmas morning. We tore open the box and could not wait until our kids were in bed that night…..so we could read!!!

Within the week, we had started our plan.  Luckily, we had around $2,000 in the bank, so our emergency fund was already taken care of. We created a budget and a debt snowball plan and were ready to attack.

I was looking at the numbers and our plan and it hit me. I was in debt again.  However, this time, I felt as if I had brought my husband along with me.  I felt horrible that I was back in this situation.

Yes, this time around the spending was not for the same reasons as before, but it had happened. Were we going to get out of debt and just do this all over again in a few years? Why would it be different this time? Did I really learn from my past mistakes?

I started giving this a lot of thought and realized that even though the bankruptcy was behind me, my money attitude was still the same.

 

MY (MUCH NEEDED) ATTITUDE CHANGE

When I looked at the money we had spent, I realized that it was because I enjoyed spending it.  It wasn’t because I was trying to replace an emptiness in my life. Heck! I was happier than I had been my entire life.  But yet, here I was, still building debt, buying things I did not really need.

I had to do a lot of self-analysis. It began with me asking myself one simple question:

“What do you feel when you think about money?”

For me, it was simple. I loved it. I loved how I could use it to get things I wanted.  And, not having had much money growing up, I thought I worked hard for this, so I will spend it as see fit.

When I said that out loud to myself, I knew it was not healthy. Money is not here just to get the things I want.  Sure, it is fun to buy items, but those things were never making me happy.  My husband and children were doing that for me.

I took another look at the debt and knew that the money had purchased things.  Those things were replaceable and if I lost them all tomorrow, I’d be OK.  However, my family wasn’t.  There was nothing in this world that could or would ever replace them.  Ever.

In that moment I made the decision that I was no longer going to love money.  I was going to love my family – and myself – more.

For me, it meant changing my entire attitude.  Once that happened, it all started to fall into place.

 

THE PLAN WE USED – THAT WORKED!

As I mentioned above, we read the Dave Ramsey plan.  While we followed most of what he said, we also had to do some of our own research and come up with our own ways to do things.

For my husband, it meant selling some of the guns he owns (he is an avid hunter).  I sold furniture and other items that were taking up space in the basement.  We had garage sales.  Any money we made from these ventures went to our debt.

I started researching and finding ways to save more money at the grocery store.  And, as a result of my findings, some of my on-line friends encouraged me to start a blog.  (And, we all know where that lead now, don’t we.  😉 ).

Through it all, we did it.

On February 10, 2010, we made the final payment on our mini van.  We had done it.  We had become debt free.

 

THE CASH CAR

Once we were out of debt, we were able to start saving money.  It felt amazing to be able to keep more of what we earned and not have to hand it over to everyone else.

My husband and I knew that we would eventually need to replace our mini van. We started paying ourselves monthly payments – instead of a car company.  We built up that savings for many, many years.

When we had enough built up to pay cash for a car, we did not do it.  Even though we had the money to pay for it, we did not really need a new car.  That was a want.

So, we saved even more and researched and waited until the right car came along.  And, it did.  More than 2 years after we had enough money to pay for the car we wanted, we made the purchase.

There is nothing like sitting down at the dealership and writing a check for a vehicle.  There is no worry about how to fit the payment into our budget. The car is ours.  We were able to drive it home and just enjoy it.

The hard work had paid off.

 

YOU CAN TO IT TOO – I PROMISE

During our journey, I found my calling.  It was to help others, just like you, do the same thing we did.  This blog is how I do that.

I have shared many stories, tips and ideas to help you and your family save money over the years. I know some of you have been able to follow my articles and get started on your own debt free journey.

However, reading a few articles here and there can be difficult to follow. My husband and I did that ourselves.  Yes, it worked for us, but we both kept wishing we could follow a plan that would not just give us a few tools on how to do things, but really be there.

Someone who would hold our hand when we were scared. That we would have others to lean for advice.  We wished that we could celebrate our victories with others who really understood and can relate.

That led me to where I am today.  This blog.  This chance to really help others.  And, in those continuing efforts, The Financial Reboot Course was born.

 

CHANGE YOUR ATTITUDE – CHANGE YOUR LIFE

For me, the one change I needed to make was my money attitude.  I did not do that the first time around and I ended up making some of the same mistakes. History was repeating itself.

Once you can do the same thing, and really understand the root of how you feel about money, then – and only then – can you start to overhaul your finances.  If you don’t change the way you handle money, you will be destined to make the same mistakes over and over again.

I want to guide you on your own financial journey. I want you to be successful. I want you to be able to shout it from the rooftops — I’M DEBT FREE!!!!

Let me help you make the change you need at this moment in your life.  Kick start your own Financial Reboot, and leave the past in the past.

 

The post From Bankruptcy to Paying $22,000 Cash for a Car appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com

Budgeting For Beginners: A FREE Five Day Quick Start Course

The post Budgeting For Beginners: A FREE Five Day Quick Start Course appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Learn How to Budget

 

If you feel stress about money, worry about paying your bills or are just tired of trying to find a way to rob Peter to pay Paul, you aren’t alone.  In fact, I get it.

I really get it.

I tried to figure it all out on my own and failed miserably. That lead me to declare bankruptcy.  While it wasn’t my finest moment, it had to happen to lead me to the place I am today.

Sometimes, our biggest mistakes force us to learn the most.  For me, thinking that I could just try to wash my hands of my financial problems was mine.  I did not take the time to figure out the right way to get control over my money and stay out of debt. Bankruptcy was the easy solution – but the wrong one.

Before filing, I had tried it all.  I organized my bills to pay them on time. I worked with debt consolidation companies to try to lower my payments. I put spending freezes in place, just to blow that a few days later.

Nothing I had done was working.

So, I did what I thought was right. I contacted an attorney and filed.

As I said, that wasn’t the answer for me.  I never took the time to get to the root of why I was looking at money the way I did.  I did not want to face my own demons head-on.  And that lead me to build up more debt…..even after bankruptcy.

Once my bankruptcy was behind me, I married my husband.  We both knew that I wanted to stay home and raise our children.  We thought that we would be OK when I quit my job, after all, my husband had a good income.

Boy.  Were we wrong.

After our daughter was born, reality set in.  The truth is, we did not really know where we were spending our money and continued to live the same lifestyle, even though our income had dropped.

Our finances were a mess.

Then, one night, after a rare dinner out with friends, the light bulb came on.  Both of us realized that we could make some changes.

From that moment on, things were different.  We both had revelations:

  • We figured out we had to have a budget.
  • We learned why we were spending.
  • We worked together to create an actionable plan.
  • We were on the same team and found new ways to save more money than ever before.
  • We had a financial plan in place.

For us, it was our REBOOT moment.  When we took control of our finances, it was like we started living again.  When we stopped trying to hard to fight it and allowed ourselves to be vulnerable to change, it happened.

This is true for anyone who wants to learn how to budget.  You have to allow yourself to be open to the change.  You need to be willing to try something new.  After all, what you are currently doing isn’t working, is it?  What more have you got to lose?

That’s where the Free Five Day Money Management Course can help. This is a simple course that anyone can take – no matter your financial situation.

You will learn:

  • How to understand your own attitude towards money
  • Really see where you spend every penny you make
  • Create a workable budget
  • Develop a plan to dig yourself out from debt
  • Finally feel in control of your finances

Like I said above, this is free.  I will not charge you a dime to take the course. Your first lesson will arrive in your inbox tomorrow morning, so you can wake up and be ready to jump in and learn.

Best of all, I’m here with you.

You aren’t alone.

Sign up now and take control of your finances. What have you got to lose?

The post Budgeting For Beginners: A FREE Five Day Quick Start Course appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com

The Ultimate Guide to Using a Cash Budget

The post The Ultimate Guide to Using a Cash Budget appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

There are many types of budgets you can try.  A quick Google search will show you lots of options – including the cash envelope budget.  If you say it will not work for you, it means you did not try doing it the right way.

cash envelope budget system

Whether you are getting out of debt or not, you can probably use some help in making sure you control your spending. Contrary to what many people say, the best way to do this is to use cash.  If you are trying to get out of debt, this is the next step you need to follow!  The cash envelope system is an important step to your debt paydown plan.

Ask many financial experts such as Dave Ramsey or Clark Howard and they will agree that using cash is an important factor in controlling your spending. And it is not a system only for people trying to get out of debt, but everyone as it really makes you think more about your spending.

If you are just learning about budgeting, you will want to check out our page — How to Budget. There, you will learn everything you want to know about budgets and budgeting.

 

HOW TO USE THE CASH BUDGET

WHY A CASH ENVELOPE SYSTEM?

Cash is King!!  I say this all of the time because I genuinely believe this.  When I bring up using cash, the first rebuttal I get is “If I have cash, I spend it far too easily.”  Sorry, I don’t buy it.  The main reason that people fail on a cash budget is a lack of tracking what they spend and assigning it a task.

[clickToTweet tweet=”The truth is that when you use cash, you spend more wisely. ” quote=”The truth is that when you use cash, you spend more wisely. “]

When you have only $200 for groceries, and you also know that it must last for two weeks.  It forces you to think twice before you buy that extra item.  A cash budget never lets you overspend because once the money is gone – it’s gone.

 

CASH ENVELOPE CATEGORIES

Getting started using the envelope system for budgeting is pretty simple.  To begin, look at your budget.  The following are cash envelope categories you should consider using:

  • Groceries
  • Clothing
  • Dining Out
  • Hair Cuts/ Beauty
  • Doctor Visits
  • Random Spending (which is your spend as you want – only if you can afford it)
  • Medicine
  • Doctor/Dentist Visits

You will notice that I didn’t include gasoline on my list.  The reason I didn’t is that most people won’t overspend at the pump.  Most of us just fill up our tanks and go about our merry way.  You also don’t drive around and burn fuel or decide to fuel up because your neighbor did.  It is on your budget but is not one you where you will overspend. Not only that, it is usually much more convenient to pay at the pump.

 

PRINTABLE DIY CASH ENVELOPE TEMPLATE

When it comes to using the cash envelope system, you can purchase one such as that sold by Dave Ramsey or you can just use the envelopes in your desk drawer.  I’ve even got a cash envelope template you can use as well (purchase HERE for $2.99).

 

HOW MUCH CASH DO I NEED?

Once you have your categories, you have to determine how much cash you need for each group.  You will figure the amount based on your pay period.

For example, if payday is every two weeks, take the total monthly grocery budgeted amount and divide it by 2.  You will then know how much money you will need for each of the two pay periods for that month.  It is important you have a budget that works (including using budget printables as needed).

Next, review, each category you will use cash for and figure up the amount you will need.  Once you have done that, you will also want to figure out how many of each denomination of bill you will need.  List the total amount, by denomination, on a piece of paper.  Take that, along with a check from your account for the amount, to the bank.  You will make a withdrawal and then split up the cash into each envelope.

 

HOW TO USE THE DAVE RAMSEY ENVELOPE SYSTEM

Sometimes, it is easier to understand something if you can see it in action.  Follow this simple cash budget example to see how it works.

 

START WITH YOUR REGULAR BUDGET

Let’s say you bring home $2,500 per month. You have completed your written budget and have items such as your mortgage, utilities, food, dining out, debts and other expenses.  Most of your expenses are paid with a check or electronic transfer. Those are not the categories to consider for your cash budget.  Instead, look at those items that you don’t pay for all at once, but rather over time.

These are the items that will work best if you use cash.  In this case, you will include groceries, clothing, random spending, doctor visits and dining out.  (We don’t include fuel because there is never a chance you will overspend on fuel).

In this example, we will only use cash for these items:

MONTHLY BUDGET

Groceries – $500
Clothing – $100
Random Spending – $80
Doctor – $50
Dining Out – $100

DETERMINE HOW MUCH CASH YOU NEED PER PAYCHECK

As you can see, the budget above is based on your monthly income.  Since you are paid every two weeks, that means your take-home pay is $1,250 twice a month.  You only need enough money to cover half of each of these categories.  Your spending for each will look like this for each pay period:

MONTHLY BUDGET DIVIDED FOR BI-WEEKLY PAY

Groceries – $250
Clothing – $50
Random Spending – $40
Doctor – $25
Dining Out – $50
Total cash needed:  $415 per pay period

Now that you see what you have budgeted to spend on each category each pay period, you need to determine how many bills of each denomination you will need to get from the bank.

 

KNOWING HOW MUCH CASH YOU NEED FOR A CASH SYSTEM

Using the same cash budget example above, here is how you will do that:

Groceries – $250 —- 3 $50 bills, 5 $20 bills
Clothing – $50 — 2 $20 bills, 1 $10 bill
Random spending – $40 —- 2 $20 bills
Doctor – $25 —- 1 $20 bill, 1 $5 bill
Dining Out – $50 —- 2 $20 bills, 1 $10 bill

You need to get this cash from the bank.  You can’t use the ATM as it will spit out only $20s and $10s and will not give you the correct number of bills.  Make a note to hand to the teller that shows how to break down the cash:

3 $50 bills
12 $20 bills
2 $10 bills
1 $5 bill

Write a check for $415, payable to “CASH” and take it, along with your slip of paper to your bank.  The teller will cash the check and give you the bills you need.

 

FILL YOUR CASH ENVELOPES

When you get home with your cash, it is time to add it to each envelope.  Find the one for each category listed above.  Pull the cash from the bank envelope and split it into each envelope, per the list above.  Add the amount of the deposit to the front of the envelope, adding to any amounts that may be left from the prior pay period.

 

USING THE CASH ENVELOPE SYSTEM

Once you have your cash and your envelopes, it is time to put them to work.  The only – and I mean only – way that this will work is if you track every. Single. Transaction.  I am not joking.  Doing this can help you stay on track, and you also have to account for everything you spend.

For example, shop as usual at the grocery store.  If your total is $20.17, you will pay with the cash from your groceries envelope.  Place any cash you get back into the envelope and then deduct your purchase from the balance.  So, if you had $100 and spent $20.17, the new total cash you have left will be $79.83.

The printable cash envelope template above includes lines on the envelope, so you have a place to track your balance.  If you use your own, add it to the outside or keep a slip of paper inside.

Make sure you track every purchase. You can always see how much money you have left and where it was spent.  It helps you monitor your spending at a glance.  Once the cash is gone  – you are done spending money.

USING THE VIRTUAL CASH ENVELOPE SYSTEM

I also get that sometimes, cash is just something you can’t do. You need (or just really prefer) using your debit or credit card instead. Is there a way you can apply this method when you spend using plastic?

Of course!

Rather than get paper money to put into your envelopes, you can use either a virtual envelope or paper tracking to monitor your spending.

Virtual envelope systems, such as ProActive, help you monitor and control your spending but allow you the convenience of using your credit or debit card.  Rather than paying with cash, you swipe but know how much you have left to spend on each category in your budget.

If you would rather opt for something that is free, you can print out cashless envelopes instead.  They work in the same fashion as cash envelopes.  You still write down the amount you have to spend on each form and as you shop, you keep track.  When you are out of “money” according to your envelope tally, you are done shopping.

You can read even more and get started with different ways to use the envelope method even if you don’t use cash.

 

HOW TO USE A CASH METHOD WHEN SHOPPING ONLINE

So, what if you don’t shop in the store, but rather, make purchases online, how would that work with a cash budget?  Can you even do that?  Yes, you can.  You just have to handle it a little differently.

The first option is to leave some of the money you normally get in cash, in your account.  For example, if you spend $100 every paycheck through online purchases, get $100 less in cash.  You can still account for it by using cashless envelopes instead.  That way, you still monitor your spending and don’t blow your budget.

The other option is to still get all of the cash you normally need.  Then, if you buy something online, head to the bank and re-deposit that back into your account.  You still get the full benefit of using cash and seeing the money come out of your envelopes.

You still can use cash when you shop online, you just have to make some adjustments.

 

WHY THE CASH ENVELOPE SYSTEM WORKS

The reason why the cash envelope system works is pretty simple.  Accountability.

When you have to make yourself accountable for your spending, you are taking control.  It also will help you spend less.  If you only have $100 to spend on dining out over the next two weeks, you think twice about ordering take out three days in a row. When the money is gone – you are done spending!!!

It isn’t entirely about cash.  It is learning self-control.  That is the one thing everyone will gain in going through this process.  It enforces this way of thinking.  You will quickly learn to love using cash, and you will feel more in control of your finances.

Cash also has more emotion attached to it. You don’t think about the consequences of a purchase when you swipe a card.  However, handing over that cold, hard cash sometimes hurts.  You do think about each purchase a bit more.

We’ve been doing this for so long that I don’t know how to shop without my envelopes!   It is routine, and it helps us always know, in a matter of minutes, how much money we have available for the things we need.

The post The Ultimate Guide to Using a Cash Budget appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com

Dave Ramsey’s Baby Steps Explained

Whereas Dave Ramsey’s Baby Steps have often been dissected one at a time, my goal in this post is to give an overview of the steps as a unit and explain why the order is essential.

dave ramsey baby steps explained

Hopefully, these steps can help you create a focused life plan for your finances, regardless of your age or financial well being.

First, the Baby Steps:

  • Step 1: $1,000 in an emergency fund.
  • Step 2: Pay off all debt except the house utilizing the debt snowball.
  • Step 3: Three to six months of savings in a fully funded emergency fund.
  • Step 4: Invest 15% of your household income into Roth IRAs and pre-tax retirement plans.
  • Step 5: College Funding
  • Step 6: Pay off your home early.
  • Step 7: Build wealth and give.

The Power of Focus

Dave’s premise with the Baby Steps is that people can accomplish great things IF they can just be focused. When you read over these seven steps, you think, “Yes. I need to be saving. But I also need to be investing for retirement. I should get my house paid off early. But I also need to be getting out of debt and saving for my kid’s college.”

You would readily agree that all of these goals are important for successful financial planning. The problem is that your stress level kicks into overdrive with the prospect of doing them all. You clench your jaw and do what you are capable of doing while feeling anxious about the goals you place on the back burner.

The Baby Steps plan works because when you stay focused on one step at a time, you can knowingly put some important goals on hold without the nagging feeling that you are leaving something undone.

You can also check out my YouTube video where I break down each of Dave’s Baby Steps here:

Why?

Because accomplishing each step puts you in a great position to accomplish the next one.

You begin to feel an empowerment and a sense of control as you get one step behind you and start the next one. You are making progress instead of treading water.

Why Are the Baby Steps in the Order They Are In?

Dave Ramsey's Baby Steps

Steps 1 and 2: $1,000 Emergency Fund and Debt Snowball

Notice that Steps 3 through 7 are all about using your money to do something positive for you and your family. Of course this money comes from your income, but the problem with most of America is that we are using our income on debt payments.

Because we are paying others instead of ourselves, we need to get rid of our debt (Step 2) in order to free up our income for Steps 3-7.

Ask yourself,

“What if I could use all the money I am currently paying to creditors to start “paying myself”?

For many people this is $1,000 to $3,000 a month.

Baby Step 2 debt snowball is designed to do just that. Step 1 is necessary before Step 2 because you don’t want to start paying off debt without having a small cushion to absorb the little unplanned expenses that will occur during Step 2.

Step 3: 3 to 6 months of Savings

After completing the first two steps, you are out of debt (except for your house) and now have that cash flow you dreamed about: all of the money you used to pay others is at your disposal. The temptation is to start investing for retirement or saving for your kid’s college or pay off your house early.

NOT SO FAST! You will get to those, but doing so prematurely is way too risky.

Stop, take a deep breath and use that cash flow to build up your emergency fund so you will indeed be ready for emergencies. This fund needs to be liquid (in a top savings account or money market account).

If you skipped the step and started any of the ensuing steps, how would you handle emergencies? Pull money from your retirement account? Rob the kid’s college savings? Borrow money against your house? All bad ideas.

Step 3 is therefore always ahead of the following steps

Steps 4, 5, and 6: Saving for Retirement, College Funding, Pay Off Home

dave ramsey baby steps

You may be asking,

“Why is retirement ahead of college funding? Wouldn’t a good parent put his children ahead of himself?”

Good question. But what if you end up without sufficient retirement income because you made college funding a higher priority? Who will you be depending on in your later years? Your kids!

The thing about retirement planning is that you only get one shot at it. The years go by and you will someday be retirement age. You don’t have a choice. On the other hand, college funding is full of choices: kids can get scholarship, they can work, they can attend community colleges, they can find work/co-op programs, etc, etc.

Step 4 is therefore ahead of step 5. But notice that Step 4 is 15% of your income. If you have cash flow greater than 15% you can apply that to college funding immediately, and if you have more than enough cash flow to accomplish both steps 4 and 5, you can use all of the extra to pay off your house early (step 6).

Note that Step 6 comes behind retirement and college funding because reversing the order could possibly give you a paid for house at the expense of a dignified retirement or helping your kids through college. Most of us wouldn’t want that.

Not sure where to start investing for retirement? Here are some tips:

  • Best Places to Open a Roth IRA – Figuring out where to start investing your 15% of income can be confusing. A great place to start is a Roth IRA, but deciding a broker is confusing. This list will help you pick the best broker for your Roth IRA.
  • Best Online Stock Broker Sign Up Bonuses – You can get hundreds of dollars or thousands of airline miles just for opening up a brokerage account.
  • Beginner Investing Strategies – If you’ve never invested before it can be overwhelming. This list breaks down getting started into manageable pieces.

Step 7: Build wealth and give.

Life is now very good! You have no debt, a great emergency fund, and a paid for house. All of the cash flow that used to go toward debt reduction and house payments is now at your disposal.

This, by the way, is the step Mandy and I are on. Being semi-retired, we don’t have a huge income, but it is very sufficient because we also don’t have any debt. We continue to invest every month and we are able to give more than we have ever given before.

Once we got our house paid off, we started to budget “bless” money, which we put into an envelope every month just to have available so we can bless others as we see the needs. We are also able to help our grown daughter and daughter-in-law cash flow their college.

As I said, life is good. Mandy and I are experiencing great financial peace and we are very grateful for Dave Ramsey’s Baby Steps.

I wish the same for you.

This article is a general overview of what Dave Ramsey has to offer and is not intended to replace his course, nor is this sponsored or endorsed by Dave Ramsey or the Lampo Group.

The post Dave Ramsey’s Baby Steps Explained appeared first on Good Financial Cents®.

Source: goodfinancialcents.com

How to Stop Spending Money You Don’t Have

The post How to Stop Spending Money You Don’t Have appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

So, you want to stop spending money.  That might be easier said than done.  When it comes to managing your money, there are things you need to do.  You know you need to budget, try to get out of debt and control your spending.

stop spending money

 

The issue is not necessarily that you are spending money on things you don’t have; you just aren’t spending it in the right way.  The issue is not that you don’t make enough money, it is just not having a plan on how to use it once you get it.

That’s what happened to me.  Unfortunately, I didn’t have a plan for my money.  That lead me down a path I did not like.

After years of working without a plan, I found myself on the steps of a courthouse declaring bankruptcy. And, because I did not learn how to make the right changes in managing my money, my husband and I found ourselves in debt a few years later.

The difference with the second time I had debt was that I took responsibility for it.  I owned what happened, and he and I worked together to make changes to not only pay off our debt but never go down that same road again.

If you find yourself in the same situation, you need to make big changes.  To start, you have to stop spending money you don’t have.  Plain and simple.

HOW DO YOU KNOW IF YOU ARE OVERSPENDING?

You’ve maxed out your credit cards

When there is no room to charge anything on your cards, you might have a problem.  In most cases, maxed credit cards signals you are living beyond your means.  If you have to continue to charge because you don’t have money, then you are spending too much.

 

You can’t find a home for your latest purchase

Your temptation might be electronics or handbags. No matter what you love to buy, you might notice you are running out of room to store things.  When the stuff takes over your home and is causing clutter, it is time to take a long hard look at how you spend money.

 

Your budget never works

There may be months when you don’t have enough money in your budget to cover your mortgage or food.  When you continually spend money on the wrong things, your budget will not work.

That means if you have just $50 for entertainment, do not spend $75.  That other $25 has to come from another budget line.

 

You spend more than you earn

Take a look at your credit card balances. You might be paying only the minimum balance because you can’t pay it in full. When you spend more than you make and continue to add more debt, take a look at what you are buying.  It might be time to pull back and stay out of the stores.

 

HOW TO STOP SPENDING SO MUCH MONEY

Use a budget 

When many people hear the word budget, what they hear is “you don’t get to spend any money.”  That is the opposite of what a budget does.  Your budget is a roadmap.  It shows you where your money should go – including the fun money you want to spend!

Your budget helps you know what you need to do with your money when you get paid.  Look at every penny as an employee of yours.  You get to tell it where it needs to go.  Some of them will go to rent, others to your car payment and still others will go to the into your savings account.

The best part of a budget is that you can allow for fun.  Learn how to budget to have fun and even how to budget if your paychecks are never the same amount.

Related: How to Figure Out How Much to Budget for Groceries

 

Write down your financial goals

Successful people start planning by having the end in mind.  It may mean taking a backward approach to your finances.

Think about what you want.  Do you want to get that credit card paid off or maybe take that dream vacation?  No matter your goal, figure out what it will take to get there, and that will help you set your goal.

It may mean fewer dinners out or putting in some overtime at work.  Whatever your goal, make sure it is clearly defined and you keep it front and center.  Put it on your refrigerator.  Keep a photo of it in your wallet.  Make sure you see that budget staring you back in the face every time you even think about spending money.  That will usually stop you right in your tracks.

Related:  The Secret Trick I Use to Stick to My Budget

 

Cash is a Must so that you never overspend

If you are someone who is always saying “I can’t stop spending money,” then you need to use cash.  I’m sure you’ve heard it time and time again. Using cash is one of the simplest tricks to help you stop spending money you don’t have.

It works because it gives you defined money.  If you have $100 to spend at the grocery store, there is no way you can even spend $101.  You don’t have it.  You are forced to spend wisely and think more about every purchase you make.

I know some of you are reading this saying “but if I have cash I just spend it so fast.”  That is because you are not tracking it and taking responsibility for your spending.

You need to use the cash envelope method.

If you have an envelope for groceries with $50 left in it, sure, you can dip into that and grab $20 to spend on lunch.  But, what happens when you need food for your family?  That means you’ve just $30 to buy food – which may not get you much.

Cash forces you to think about every purchase you make.

Related:  How You Can Become Accountable With Your Money

 

Stop paying for convenience

There is a quick fix for nearly everything.  You can find dinners in boxes, small pre-packaged snacks, etc.  Rather than purchase convenience items, buy the larger size snacks and then re-package yourself into smaller baggies.  You will not only get more out of a box, but you can even control how much you put into each baggie.

There are other ways we pay for convenience.  We pay for someone to iron our shirts, wash our cars and even mow our lawns.  By doing these things ourselves, we can keep much more money and easily stop overspending.

Read more:  How You are Killing Your Grocery Budget

 

Put away the credit cards to halt spending money

One of the simplest ways to stop spending money is to get out the scissors and cut up those credit cards!!  Or, if you aren’t ready to cut them up, put them on ice.  Literally.  Freeze your credit card in a block of ice.

If you keep spending, you have to cut off the source at its knees.  While I don’t think credit cards are a good fit for everyone, I know they work for some.

If you must use credit cards, never charge more than you have in the bank to pay it off.  That means you can’t charge the amount you believe you will get on your paycheck.  There is never a guarantee that your check will arrive.  Spend only the amount you have, not what you will receive.

Related:  How to Pay off Your Credit Card Debt

Pay your bills on time

We all have bills.  We know when they are due.  When you miss the payment due date, you get assessed a late charge.   Pay them on time, so you don’t pay more than you need to.

In addition to late fees, not paying your bills on time can have an adverse effect on your credit score. Learn how to organize your bills, so you never pay them late again.

 

Do not live above your means

Few of us would not love new clothes or a new car. We all would like to make more money or get the hottest new device.  The thing is, can you afford it?  Is it a want or is it a need?

If you are using credit or loans to get items that you can not afford, then you are living beyond your means and spending money you don’t have.  Scale back and make sure that you can honestly afford the house or the car and that it doesn’t ruin your budget and cost you too much.

Read more: Defining Your Wants vs. Your Needs

 

Don’t fall for impulse buys

Stores are sneaky about making us spend money.  They use signs, layout and even scents to lure you into wanting to buy more.  The thing is, if you purchase something you did not intend to, then you are already blowing your budget and probably overspending.

Another way that you are spending too much is when you plan dinner but then decide at the last minute to go out to dinner instead.  Why do that when you have food waiting for you at home (which you’ve already paid for)?

The final reason you may impulse buy is that of emotion.  If you feel a rush because of that new item, you may purchase out of impulse and emotion instead of need.

Read more:  Stopping Impulse Shopping

Plan your meals

One of the most significant changes we made was to menu plan.  It took me some time to put it all together, but now, I can plan our meals in no time at all.  I use the simple menu planning system that I’ve taken time to build over the years.

While this works for me, I remember when I was learning how to menu plan.  It was quite a process, and I relied upon the help of some experts in the field.   One of them I have used is Erin Chases’s $5 Meal Plan.  I loved how simple it was to create our meals each week.

Even the best menu plan won’t work if you aren’t eating what you buy.  Make sure you are not making mistakes with your grocery budget and eat what you buy.  After all, throwing food away is just money in the trash.

Related:  Money Saving Secrets Stores Won’t Tell You

 

Challenge yourself to spend less 

There is something fun about trying to beat yourself at your own game.  By this I mean, if you have $150 to spend on groceries for the week, try to spend only $130.  That gives you $20 more to spend on something else — or put towards your goal.

Related:  The Yearly Savings Challenge for Kids and Adults

 

Stay out of the stores so you don’t shop

If you can’t control your spending and continue spending money you don’t have, you have to remove the temptation.  Even something that seems harmless can result in spending money.

Related:  Fun and Frugal Date Night Ideas

 

Track the money you are spending

Keep track of your spending by adding up the amounts on your phone.  That way, you’ll have no surprises when you get to the checkout lane. You can try Shopping Calculator for Android or Total-Plus Shopping Calculator on iTunes.

When you start to see that total creep up, you realize how much you are spending. That may help you think twice about that extra box of treats you are tempted to toss into the shopping cart.

 

Use the three-day rule before you spend a dime

The three-day rule is pretty simple.  If you see something you want, wait for three days before you buy it.  Once the third day is up, ask yourself if you still feel it is something you need.

If it is, look at your budget to ensure it works with this month’s spending.  Then, double check the cash to make sure you have enough to pay for it.  If both of these work, you can consider buying it.

The funny thing is that most purchases are impulse buys and the three day waiting period helps you realize you don’t need it.  And had you purchased it, you may even have buyer’s remorse at the three-day mark.

Related:  The Trick To Make Sure You Never Overspend

 

Don’t use coupons and skip the sales

Sales are very tempting.  They lure you in and often result in making purchases you would not do otherwise.  That is why you nee your list. Stick to it and don’t fall for the sales.

You also need to put away the coupons.  Well, you can use them, but responsibly.  If you would not purchase an item at full price, you should never buy it only because there is a coupon.  A coupon is not a golden ticket to shop.

In addition to this, avoid the clearance aisles and end caps.  These are money spending traps!  You walk by, and your eye is drawn the end cap with the big SALE sign in front of it.  If you don’t need that item, don’t grab it.  Also, don’t walk by the clearance section.  It is very easy to pick up items you don’t really need.  That makes you again spend money you had not planned on.

Instead, shop the sections you need.  If you need detergent, go to that section and grab your item and then go to the next on your list.  Don’t wander through the store as you will be more likely to do “cart tossing.”   This is when you put items in your cart without noticing what you are spending.

I’m not saying not to buy anything on sale.  Just get the things you need that are on sale this week, or that you will need in the next weeks.  You probably need spaghetti noodles, but you don’t need a new pair of shoes.

Related: The Money Traps You Will Fall For

 

Never shop without a list

Never shop without a grocery list. Ever. Then, force yourself to stick to it.

Some simple ideas include using a timer to limit how long you can be in the store.  If you have only 20 minutes to shop, you will be less likely to grab the items you don’t need and stick with those that are on your list.

Another is to challenge yourself to see how fast you can finish your shopping.  If you have the list and stick to it, you’ll find you spend less time shopping and more time enjoying the things you love.

The best reason to use a list is that you don’t have to worry about forgetting that “one item” you know you need.  When you force yourself to make a shopping list and stick to it, you’ll always have everything you need on hand for dinner.

 

Keep emotion out of shopping

One tip is never to shop hungry.  When you do, your stomach controls what you buy.  The added benefit is buying the healthy foods you need.

If I am feeling bad about myself, buying something I have been wanting may end up making its way home with me. Spending money to make myself feel better never works.

There are many emotions attached to spending.  You have to identify which one(s) apply to you and find a way to fulfill that need through another method – other than spending money.

 

Define Needs vs. Wants

There are items we need.  You need food, but do you need the extra box of cookies?  Yes, the sweater is really cute but is it something you need or just something you want.  Ask yourself  “is this a need or a want” with each item you buy.  You’ll soon be on your way to less overspending.

 

Clean and declutter

When you declutter, you find all of those items you’ve spent money on and no longer need.  It makes you realize where you are spending.  You will also recall how clean your closet now is. Do you really want to fill it back up with more stuff?

The added benefit of decluttering is that it keeps your house clean and organized!  You can find what you need more easily and don’t have so much “stuff” cluttering the house.

 

Save first, spend later

It is important always to pay yourself first.  Remember that the amount you have to spend is what is left over after you pay your bills and pay yourself.

You should always tell your money where to go instead of it deciding for you.  So many do that the opposite and save after they spend.  If you still save a little, you will quickly build a nice emergency fund and can have less guilt about your spending.

 

Learn from your mistakes

The most important thing you must do is figure out where you’ve gone wrong in the past.  Your mistakes will be different from everyone else’s.  You may shop out of emotion while someone else does out of boredom.

You also need to keep in mind that you will make mistakes.  There will be months when you fall off the wagon.  Don’t beat yourself up over it.  Use it is a chance to learn from them and do what you can to not repeat them again.

Related:  The Mistakes You Will Make When Getting Out of Debt

Gaining control of your spending is possible.  You just need to have the desire – and the tools – to make it happen.

 

stop spending

 

The post How to Stop Spending Money You Don’t Have appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com