’60 Minutes’ Correspondent Scott Pelley Sells Connecticut Mansion at a Loss

Scott Pelley Sells Connecticut Home
realtor.com, Michele Crowe/CBS/Getty “60 Minutes” correspondent Scott Pelley has finally sold his Darien, CT, home for a loss.

The former “CBS Evening News” host initially listed the home in 2017 for $3,985,000. But with no takers, the listing eventually came off the market.

In June 2019, the home was relisted for $3.25 million, and in September 2020, it was sold for $2.75 million. Pelley had purchased the place in 2007 for $4 million.

Built in 2002, the five-bedroom, seven-bath estate is situated on a cul-de-sac. Its 2.4 acres include level land and manicured lawns.

The elegant entry features a dramatic double staircase. The open floor plan offers 7,532 square feet of living space that blends traditional features with modern upgrades.

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Grand foyer

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Kitchen

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Dining room

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Office

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Master suite

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Master bath

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Master closet

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The chef’s kitchen includes double ovens, a gas cooktop, and island with bar seating. It opens to a sunny family room with views of the property and pond. For the work-from-home crowd, the mansion offers a spacious office with wood paneling and fireplace.

There’s also reportedly a studio, which allowed Pelley to work on “60 Minutes” segments from home—and which he dubbed the Darien bureau.

The upper level includes the master suite, which features a massive walk-in closet, large sitting room, fireplace, and balcony overlooking the backyard.

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Watch: Chuck Woolery Hopes a Buyer Will Make a ‘Love Connection’ With His Texas Home

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The master bath includes a soaking tub, stand-in shower, and dual vanities. The remaining bedrooms are also on the upper level. Other spots in the home to unwind in include a library, terrace, and basement.

In 2016, Pelley, a Texas native, purchased a 24-acre Texas ranch for $1,250,000, according to the New York Post. Closer to his New York office,  he and his wife, June, maintain a two-bedroom Manhattan condo, which they reportedly picked up for $2.25 million in 2016.

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Backyard with pond

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Pelley has been a correspondent and anchor for CBS News for more than 31 years. He served as the anchor of the “CBS Evening News” from 2011 to 2017. He’s currently a correspondent on “60 Minutes.” In 2019, Pelley wrote “Truth Worth Telling: A Reporter’s Search for Meaning in the Stories of Our Times.”

Keiley Fuller with Compass represented the seller.

The post ’60 Minutes’ Correspondent Scott Pelley Sells Connecticut Mansion at a Loss appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com

The Worst Cities to Own a Car

The Worst Cities to Own a Car

The number of Americans driving to work alone is on the rise, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. With the increase in drivers comes traffic, which means more time and money spent idling in cars. Some cities are better equipped to deal with the mass of drivers, managing to keep traffic delays and congestion to a minimum. Other cities are equipped with walkable streets and reliable mass transit options, making car ownership less necessary.

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We considered these and other factors to find the worst cities to own a car. Specifically, we looked at hours spent in traffic per year for the average driver, the annual cost of traffic for the average driver, the rate of motor vehicle theft, the number of repair shops and parking garages per driver, the commuter stress index and the non-driving options a resident has for getting around. To understand where we got our data and how we put it together to create our final ranking, see the data and methodology section below.

Key Findings

  • Cities on the coasts â€“ The entire top 10 is comprised of cities on or close to the coasts. This makes sense as many of the largest cities in the country are located on the coasts. Plus, on the East Coast in particular, these cities tend to be older which means they were not built to handle car traffic.
  • Grin and bear it – Traffic can get pretty bad. However, in some cities getting around by car is just about the only option you have if you want to leave your house. Thus some cities with really bad traffic like Los Angeles or Long Beach didn’t quite crack the top 10.

The Worst Cities to Own a Car

1. Newark, New Jersey

Brick City tops our ranking of the worst cities to own a car. What’s tough about being a car owner in Newark is the traffic. It’s part of the New York City metro area which has 19 million people, 5 million of whom drive to work. Newark is stuck right in the middle of this bumper-to-bumper traffic. Plus, if you’re a car owner in Newark, the risk of having your car stolen is much higher than it is in other cities. Newark ranks eighth in the country for motor vehicle thefts per 1,000 residents.

Related Article: The States With the Worst Drivers

2. San Francisco, California

The City in the Bay grabs the second spot for worst places to own a car. Being stuck in traffic costs the average commuter in San Francisco $1,600 per year. That cost includes both the value of the time spent in traffic and the cost of gas. SF is also one of the 10 worst cities for motor vehicle thefts per resident, another reason to forgo car ownership.

3. Washington, D.C.

The District and the surrounding metro area sees some of the worst traffic in the country. The average D.C. commuter spends 82 hours per year in traffic. Depending on how you slice it, that’s either two working weeks or almost three-and-a-half days of doing nothing but shaking your fist at your fellow drivers. That traffic is equal to an annual cost of $1,834 per commuter.

4. Oakland, California

One argument against car ownership in Oakland is the crime. There were almost 6,400 motor vehicle thefts in the city of Oakland or 15 auto thefts per 1,000 residents. That’s the highest rate in the country. The average Oakland driver can also expect to spend 78 hours per year in traffic. On the plus side, if something goes wrong with your wheels in Oakland, it shouldn’t be too difficult to get it fixed. There are more than six repair shops per 10,000 drivers in Oakland – the highest rate in the top 10.

5. Arlington, Virginia

As previously mentioned, the Washington, D.C. metro area has the worst traffic in the country. Unfortunately for the residents of Arlington, they are a part of that metro area. They face the same brutal 82 hours per year spent in traffic, on average. It costs Arlington residents $1,834 per year, on average, waiting in that traffic. For residents of Arlington, a car is more of a necessity than it is for people living in D.C., which is why it ranks lower in our study.

6. Portland, Oregon

Of all the cities in our top 10, Portland is the least onerous for the driving commuter. Commuters driving around the Portland metro area can be thankful that, on average, they spent only 52 hours per year in traffic. That traffic still costs each driver about $1,200. However, drivers in Portland looking for a parking garage may be out of luck. Portland has the second-lowest number of parking garages per driver in our study, and if you are looking to get your car fixed, Portland ranks in the bottom 13 for repair shops per capita.

7. Anaheim, California

Anaheim commuters are well-acquainted with traffic. Anaheim (and the rest of the Los Angeles metro area) ranks third in average hours per year spent in traffic, first for commuter stress index and fifth for annual cost of idling in traffic. Anaheim only ranks seventh because Walkability.com gives the city a 46 out of 100 for non-driving options. That’s the lowest score in our top 10 meaning, while owning a car here is a pain, not owning one makes getting around a true struggle.

8. New York, New York

New York is the rare American city where public transportation is usually your best bet for getting from point A to point B. All that accessibility makes car ownership unnecessary here. For New Yorkers who do drive, the traffic is not pleasant. New York drivers spend $1,700 per year, on average, waiting in traffic. That’s the third-highest cost in our study.

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9. Seattle, Washington

Seattle has pretty bad traffic. Commuters here probably aren’t surprised to hear the average driver spends 63 hours per year in traffic. And coupled with the traffic is the high number of motor vehicle thefts. Seattle has the fourth-highest rate of motor vehicle thefts per 1,000 residents in the country.

10. Boston, Massachusetts

Boston ranked well in our study on the most livable cities in the U.S. partially based on how easy it is to get around without a car. After New York and San Francisco, Boston is the most walkable city in the country, making the cost of having a car one expense which Bostonians can possibly go without. Although occasionally maligned, the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority is a great option for commuters who want to avoid the 64 hours per year Boston drivers spend in traffic.

The Worst Cities to Own a Car

Data and Methodology

In order to rank the worst cities to own a car, we looked at data on the 100 largest cities in the country. Specifically we looked at these seven factors:

  • Average total hours commuters spend in traffic per year. Data comes from the Texas A&M Transportation Institute 2014 Mobility Score Card.
  • Cost of time spent in traffic per person. This measures the value of extra travel time and the extra fuel consumed by vehicles in traffic. Travel time is calculated at a value of $17.67 per hour per person. Fuel cost per gallon is the average price for each state. Data comes from the Texas A&M Transportation Institute 2014 Mobility Score Card.
  • Commuter stress index. This metric is developed by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute 2014 Mobility Score Card. It measures the difference in travel time during peak congestion and during no congestion. A higher ratio equals a larger difference.
  • Non-driving options. This metric measures the necessity of owning a car in each city by considering the city’s walk score, bike score and transit score. We found the average of those three scores for each city. Higher scores mean residents are less reliant on cars. Data comes from Walkability.com.
  • Motor vehicle thefts per 1,000 residents. Data on population and motor vehicle thefts comes from the FBI’s 2015 Uniform Crime Reporting Program and from local police department and city websites. We used the most up to date data available for cities where 2015 data was not available.
  • Number of repair shops per 10,000 drivers. Data on drivers comes from Texas A&M Transportation Institute 2014 Mobility Score Card. Data on repair shops comes from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2014 Business Patterns Survey.
  • Parking garages per 10,000 drivers. Data on drivers comes from Texas A&M Transportation Institute 2014 Mobility Score Card. Data on parking garages comes from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2014 Business Patterns Survey.

We ranked each city across each factor, giving double weight to non-driving options and half weight to motor vehicle thefts per driver, repair shops per driver and parking garages per driver. All other factors received single weight. We then found the average ranking across each city. Finally we gave each city a score based on their average ranking. The city with the highest average received a score of 100 and the city with the lowest average received a score of 0.

Questions about our study? Contact us at press@smartasset.com.

Photo credit: Â©iStock.com/seb_ra

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Source: smartasset.com

States With the Worst Drivers – 2016 Edition

States With the Worst Drivers

It is common occurrence on American highways for near-accidents to occur. It is also a common occurrence on American highways for people in near-accidents, to look at the license plate of the near-accident-causer and think to themselves, “Oh, well of course they’re from Massachusetts.” Or some other state. It seems like almost every state has a reputation for having terrible drivers. Thanks to data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration we can confirm some of those myths and dispel others.

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According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration around 32,000 people were killed in vehicle-related incidents in 2014. Of course some incidents are genuinely accidents, while some are clearly the fault of one driver, like in the event of drunk driving. But deaths and DUIs are not the only metrics to measure bad driving, people who receive speeding tickets or do not have automobile insurance can also be considered negligent drivers.

To find the states with the worst drivers SmartAsset looked at number of drivers, DUI arrests, people killed, google trends in speeding tickets and percentage of people who have auto insurance. To find out how we put all these numbers together to create our index please read the full methodology below.

Key Findings

No Massachusetts. Boston drivers usually have a reputation as bad drivers but the numbers we analyzed don’t bear that out. Massachusetts ranks 48 on our list. While we have no data on non-fatal accidents, the fact that they lead the nation in insured rate is a positive sign.

Be careful when driving in the southeast. Maybe it’s the heat causing road rage, but four out of the top ten states in our study are located in the southeast.

States with the Worst Drivers

1. Florida

Florida is often plagued with a reputation for bad drivers. The numbers seem to show that this might, in fact, be true. Floridians google “speeding tickets” and “traffic tickets” more than any other state. They also have the second lowest number of insured drivers in the nation.

2. Mississippi

Another southern state and another state in which one ought to be extra careful when driving through. Mississippi had the 5th highest deaths resulting from vehicular incidents. One area where Mississippi can improve is in DUIs. Mississippi had the 12th highest rate of DUI arrests per driver in the country. Like Florida relatively few people are insured. They rank 3rd worst in that category with only 77% insured.

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3. Oklahoma

Continuing on the theme of states with low insured driver rates, Oklahoma has the least. Only 74% of drivers in Oklahoma are insured. It does not get much better for the state in the other categories we looked at. They have one of the 15 worst scores in DUIs per thousand drivers (7.74), number of people killed per thousand drivers in vehicular incidents (.21) and rate of googling parking and traffic tickets (52.13).

4. New Jersey

The Garden State has the infamy of being the state with the second most deaths per driver at 0.62. New Jersey drivers are more likely to be insured than some of the other states on our list. New Jersey drivers are insured at a rate of almost 90%, coming in 22nd on our list.

5. Delaware

New Jerseys neighbor and rival for worst drivers in the northeast, Delaware is unfortunately the only state with more deaths per driver than New Jersey. One curious statistic is that while Delaware has the lowest DUI rate per driver, 40% of deaths occurred when the driver was above the legal limit for drinking, which is the 4th highest rate in the country.

6. Alabama

Another southern state and a similar story to the others with pretty bad scores all around. One bright spot – Alabama has the 4th best score with only 1.42 DUI arrests per thousand drivers. Like Delaware, though, that statistic does not tell the whole story, 33% of deaths in Alabama resulted from a driver being over the legal alcohol limit.

7. Vermont

Vermont leads the nation in DUIs per driver with 50 per thousand drivers. However, they also have the lowest percentage of deaths resulting from drunk driving, at 20%.

8. Tennessee

Tennessee is one of the least insured states in the country, with 20% of people not having car insurance. Tennessee also has the 18th highest number of deaths per thousand drivers. One positive is that they are in the better half of the country for DUI per thousand drivers at 5.7.

9. Texas

Tragically for Texas it has the highest percentage of deaths coming from drunk drivers at 40% and yet it is in the better half of states for DUI arrests. Recent news that Uber and Lyft will both be leaving Austin may have an impact. According to MyStatesman, Austin only has permits for 756 legal taxis and is hoping to increase that to 1,161. But for a tech hot-spot with a population of 850,000 even this may not be enough.

10. Nevada

Nevada is the 3rd worst state for traffic and speeding tickets (when comparing googling trends) as well as being the 17th worst state for DUIs. The good news is that 88% of Nevada drivers are insured.

States with the Worst Drivers

Data and Methodology

In order to find out which state had the worst drivers SmartAsset collected data across 4 metrics.

Percentage insured. Data is taken from the Insurance Research Council.

DUI per thousand drivers. Number of drivers is taken from the Federal Highway Administration. Number of DUIs is taken from the State Justice Department.

Deaths per thousand drivers. Data is taken from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System, which is part of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Google trends on driving tickets. This data is the average of the scores each state got in google trends for the 8 phrases: speeding ticket, “speeding ticket,” speeding tickets, “speeding tickets,” traffic ticket, “traffic ticket,” traffic tickets and “traffic tickets.”

We then indexed each factor for every state giving equal weighting and then finding the average score per state to create the final index.

Questions about our study? Contact us at blog@smartasset.com.

Photo credit: Â©iStock.com/Ben Harding

The post States With the Worst Drivers – 2016 Edition appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

Source: smartasset.com

Elan Max Cash Preferred – 5% On Two Categories

There is a new credit card being offered by a number of credit unions called ‘Elan Max Cash Preferred’. This card is basically identical to the U.S. Bank Cash+ card, although the sign up bonus is usually $150 instead of the common $200 offer on the Cash+ card. Card basics:

  • No annual fee
  • You can choose two categories to earn 5% in (limit $2,000 in spend per quarter), one category to earn 2% in one and 1% on all other purchases

The advantage to the Elan card is that it seems to be easier to approved than the Cash+ card. It’s available from the following credit unions (via MyFICO):

  • Abby Bank (Wisconsin)
  • Air Force Academy Federal Credit Union (Colorado, veterans)
  • Allegiance Credit Union (Oklahoma)
  • Alliance Credit Union (Missouri)
  • All South Federal Credit Union (South Carolina)
  • Amplify Credit Union (Texas)
  • Astera Credit Union (Michigan)
  • Atlantic Union Bank (Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina)
  • Banc of California (California)
  • Bank of Albuquerque (New Mexico)
  • Bank of Clarke County (Virginia)
  • Bank Five Nine (Wisconsin)
  • Bank of Oklahoma (Oklahoma)
  • Bank of Texas (Texas)
  • Bank of Utah (Utah)
  • Banner Federal Credit Union (Arizona)
  • Bay Coast Bank (Massachusetts, Rhode Island)
  • Beacon Credit Union (Indiana)
  • Bell Bank (Arizona, Minnesota, North Dakota)
  • Bremer Bank (Minnesota, North Dakota, Wisconsin)
  • Byrn Mawr Trust Company (Pennsylvania)
  • Buckeye State Bank (Ohio)
  • Busey Bank (Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Florida)
  • Capital City Bank (Florida, Georgia, Alabama)
  • Capital Credit Union (Wisconsin)
  • Cattle Bank and Trust (Nebraska)
  • CCF Bank (Wisconsin, Minnesota)
  • Central Pacific Bank (Hawaii)
  • Centricity Credit Union (Minnesota)
  • Centris Federal Credit Union (Nebraska, Iowa)
  • Chevron Federal Credit Union (United States)
  • Comerica Bank (California, Arizona, Texas, Florida, Michigan)
  • Cornerstone Bank (North Dakota, South Dakota)
  • Credit Union of Georgia (Georgia)
  • Envision Bank (Massachusetts)
  • Desert Financial Credit Union (Arizona)
  • First Class Community Credit Union (Iowa)
  • First Financial Northwest Bank (Washington)
  • First National Bank Texas (Arkansas, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona)
  • First National Bank of Waterloo (Illinois)
  • First State Bank of Florida Keys (Florida)
  • Flagstar Bank (California, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin)
  • F&M Bank (Farmers and Merchants) (California)
  • Fulton Bank (Virginia, Maryland, DC, Pennsylvania)
  • Greater Nevada Credit Union (Nevada)
  • Green Belt Bank and Trust (Iowa)
  • Guaranty Bank and Trust (Texas)
  • Highland Bank (Minnesota)
  • Home Federal Bank (Tennessee)
  • Horizon Bank (Indiana, Michigan)
  • Incredible Bank (Wisconsin)
  • Intrust Bank (Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas)
  • Johnson Financial Group (Wisconsin)
  • Liberty Bank (Connecticut)
  • Meriwest Credit Union (California)
  • Merrimack Valley Credit Union (Massachusetts)
  • Mid Penn Bank (Pennsylvania)
  • MIT Federal Credit Union (Massachusetts)
  • Nodaway Valley Bank (Missouri)
  • Northside Community Bank (Illinois)
  • NRL (Naval Research Lab) Federal Credit Union (DC, Virginia, Maryland)
  • Oklahoma Central Credit Union (Oklahoma)
  • Park National Bank (Ohio)
  • Pawtucket Credit Union (Rhode Island)
  • People’s United Bank (Connecticut)
  • Pikes Peak Credit Union (Colorado)
  • Premier Bank (Ohio, Indiana, Michigan)
  • Prevail Bank (Wisconsin)
  • Public Service Credit Union (Michigan)
  • Renasant Bank (Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida)
  • Radius Bank (Massachusetts)
  • Rockland Trust (Massachusetts)
  • Twin River Bank (Idaho, Washington)
  • U.S. Employees Credit Union (US government employee and retiree)
  • Valley National Bank (New Jersey, New York, Florida, Alabama)
  • Wesbanco (West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio)

Source: doctorofcredit.com

A Quick Guide to the Difference Between Medicaid & Medicare

Medicare and Medicaid may sound alike, but the health insurance programs are wildly different. Here's a quick primer.

Medicare and Medicaid may sound alike, but these government health insurance programs are dramatically different from one another. Here’s a brief overview.

What Is Medicare?

Administered by the federal government, Medicare is a health insurance program primarily for adults who are 65 years of age or older and have paid into the Social Security system for at least 40 quarters (about 10 years). An individual who lacks the necessary work credits can also benefit from the program through their spouse, as can individuals who are younger than 65 but have received Social Security Disability Insurance payments for at least two years.

What Medicare Covers

There are different parts to Medicare that make it a veritable “alphabet soup.” For example, Medicare Part A covers mostly in-patient hospital care and provides a minimal benefit for skilled nursing care and hospice care. Medicare Part B covers the costs of outpatient care, such as doctors’ visits, lab tests and preventative care. Medicare Part C is the Medicare Advantage program and an alternative to Medicare parts A and B.

Like most types of insurance, Medicare parts A, B and C include co-pays and deductibles. Generally, the amount of income you earn and the amount of assets you own are irrelevant for participation, so paupers, billionaires and everyone in between can be eligible.

Surprisingly, given that Medicare is primarily a program for individuals 65 and older, the program covers just a small portion of the cost of a nursing home stay. At most, it fully covers the costs associated with the initial 20 days of a stay and provides only partial coverage for the next 80 days. In addition, for a stay to be covered, a patient must meet certain requirements.

For example, the patient must have been hospitalized for at least three consecutive days directly prior to receiving care at a nursing home and that care must be considered medically necessary. Because of these requirements, patients or their families are often forced to pay out of pocket for nursing home care or seek relief from Medicaid.

What Is Medicaid?

Medicaid (known as Medi-Cal in California) is a federal-state program. It primarily acts as a safety net for those who can’t pay for healthcare.

Seniors can participate in Medicaid if they pass three tests: a medical necessity test, an asset test and an income test.

The medical necessity test requires that skilled nursing care is necessary to address the patient’s medical needs. The asset test places strict limits on how much property a patient and the patient’s spouse can own while benefiting from Medicaid. The income test limits how much individuals and couples may earn to be eligible for Medicaid.

There are ways to get around these eligibility tests if you or a loved one can’t pass them but want Medicaid to help pay for the cost of a nursing home stay. However, doing so may require the help of an attorney who practices elder law. A relatively new kind of law, elder law can help individuals preserve their assets and qualify for Medicaid. (Disclosure: The Wiewel Law firm, in Austin, Texas, specializes in estate planning.)

Remember, Medicaid planning is a complicated process and even a small error can mean the program will refuse to help pay for the cost of a nursing home stay. Be sure to speak with an expert if you have concerns.

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